Dr Sally Frampton

Dr Sally Frampton is a historian of medicine and healthcare. Her book, Belly-Rippers, Surgical Innovation and the Ovariotomy Controversy (2018), explores a controversial operation developed in the nineteenth century – the removal of the ovaries. Following this project Sally went on to do further research on surgical risk and innovation and has written about the development of keyhole surgery in the 1980s. Sally’s current book project explores the global development of medical journalism as a specialist form of writing in the nineteenth and early twentieth centuries, and how this has shaped the meaning of medicine.

As Humanities and Healthcare Research Fellow, Sally is tasked with fostering greater interdisciplinary collaboration at the University between humanities researchers and the Medical Sciences Division and is particularly interested in the ways in which humanities can be used in the teaching and training of medical and healthcare practitioners. Along with colleagues at Harris Manchester College, Sally works on the Wellcome Institutional Strategic Support Funded project ‘Advancing Medical Professionalism: Integrating Humanities Teaching in the University of Oxford’s Medical School’.

Sally has also been involved in a number of public engagement projects, including as lead on ‘Mind-Boggling Medical History’, a card game designed to introduce medical history to new audiences (http://www.ox.ac.uk/research/research-impact/mind-boggling-medical-history).

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